Starting Salaries Projected to Rise 3.8 Percent in 2015

Starting Salaries Projected to Rise 3.8 Percent in 2015

According to human resources firm Robert Half, it is expected that annual salaries for professionals in the USA will increase by 3.8 percent in 2015.  Those working in information technology (IT) and other technology fields are expected to benefit the most. New entrants in the information technology industry will receive compensation that outpaces the general trend, as they are expected to earn 5.7 percent more in their initial salaries, survey reports find.

Those professionals in the financial, accounting, creativity, and marketing-related industries are expected to receive salary hikes slightly below the general trend at 3.5 percent. 

The supply of talent in many sectors is much lower than is the demand, thereby helping to boost wages to attract more people to the respective fields. This trend is particularly visible in the IT and finance industries. It has become important for these industries to improve their starting salaries to compete in the market for talent. The need becomes more acute when these skilled workers are aware of their growing market demand.

In 2015, mobile technology, security and data management services are expected to see an increase in demand for talent. In fact mobile application developers are expected to receive the highest yearly compensation packages.

The legal sector is also experiencing an increase in wages as well, though it is somewhat muted compared to the aforementioned industries. Demand is higher for middle and senior level professionals in high-growth areas such as litigation, commercial law and intellectual property protection. Skilled paralegals are also expected to be high in demand with higher payouts.

Starting salaries of employees in the administrative sector will increase by 3.4 percent. Initial payment of experienced executives and administrative assistants, especially in healthcare, human resources and customer service areas are expected to rise more than other industries.

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