Mass Business Blog

News and Perspectives on Massachusetts Business and Economy

As Housing Booms in MA, Residents Push for Even More Construction

August 2015 marked the third straight month of increased housing sales in Massachusetts. This continued spike has lawmakers worried about the availability of affordable housing in the commonwealth—housing units are being swooped up faster than they are being built. The goal is to make sure that, as MA continues to compete to bring in workers, it also competes to provide sufficient housing for those workers. A bill, sponsored by the Housing Committee co-chairs, Senator Linda Dorcena Forry (D) and Representative Kevin Honan (D), has been proposed that would increase the amount of housing stock in the commonwealth. Housing Partnership Directors Testify In early October, advocates for the bill testified before the commonwealth’s Housing Committee. Somerville Mayor Joe Curtatone, among others, have stood behind the bill. MA Housing Partnership Executive Director Clark Ziegler testified that the average single-family home in metropolitan Boston takes up over one acre of land, which is about equal to one NFL football field. The size of these properties has less to do with what people want and more with what local zoning restrictions demand. Even though most buyers prefer homes on smaller lots in neighborhoods that are more walkable, zoning laws make these homes more difficult to put together. Many communities ban the building of multi-family homes altogether. It isn’t news to say that the cost of renting housing (or the cost of taxes on owned property) in Massachusetts continues to spike. We’re still picking our jaws off the floor after reading this article about wages and rental costs. Even short-term rental properties face increased regulations and pricing. Residents statewide are feeling trapped—some areas are simply becoming too expensive for people to afford. Moderate and Low Income Residences One of the goals of the bill is to address the lack of low- and moderate-income housing stock in Massachusetts. If passed into law, the bill would...

Will Aging Infrastructure Prevent Massachusetts Business Growth?

Massachusetts is known for its convoluted roadways and aggressive drivers. Its residents are no stranger to the aging infrastructure that transforms their daily commutes into heroic efforts of driving prowess and cunning. The roads are both difficult to navigate and dangerous to traverse— full of potholes and spans of structurally deficient bridges. Repairs are underway throughout the state on bridges, highways and tunnels, which only seems to add hours in detours and traffic as unsound areas are brought up to meet standards. While progress is being made, the work that has occurred has only made a small dent in Massachusetts’ transportation system woes, and is further affecting timely delivery of goods, commuting times, and the overall appeal of the state as a location to do business. The New England Council, a business advocacy group, has expressed concern over the congestion caused by road construction, as these type of inconveniences are often a factor in whether companies stay and expand or leave a region. At the moment, 20 tunnel projects and over 250 road reconstruction and resurfacing projects have entered the design phase, according to the Massachusetts Department of Transportation. Whether these projects will occur, and when, is another story. If approved, these repairs would happen in addition to projects like the ongoing initiative to repair more than 450 bridges. Initially a $3 billion project, it is now predicted to cost a total of $14.4 billion by the time the statewide repairs are completed. Massachusetts has been experiencing a notable increase in economic growth over the last five years, however businesses are concerned about the timely delivery of goods and services. In a fast-paced economy, meeting deadlines with a tight turnaround time is a key factor of success. Delays and detours ultimately affect the bottom line. The difficulties commuters faced last winter, between impassable roads, service delays, and cancellations of the...

Brockton Residents Approve Casino In The Recent Referendum

The much anticipated casino referendum for the proposed $650 million resort casino for the Brockton Fairgrounds won by a close 143 votes. The Enterprise newspaper reported that approximately 32% of the city’s 44,010 voting population casted their votes to approve the multi-million dollar casino venture. According to the state’s law, local approval must be granted to obtain a casino license. The proposed casino will be a complex that is expected to include a 225 room hotel, an event center, and many restaurants set on approximately 45 acres of land. The cities of New Bedford and Somerset are also in contention with Brockton for the casino license that has been reserved for Southeastern Massachusetts. Many of the citizens voted favorably due to the 1,500 permanent casino job opportunities and the minimum $10 million annual income that Brockton would gain if the project is approved. One of the concerns cited by citizens opposing the casino is its close proximity to the Brockton High School. The project developer for the Brockton casino—Mass Gaming and Entertainment—had invested over $1 million in the campaign to win the approval of the citizens. However, opponents to the casino spent roughly $3,000 for their cause. State officials have given the developers of the New Bedford casino until June 9th to secure their financial backing or their bid will not be considered. The developers have stated they are confident they can secure their financial backing by the deadline and that New Bedford will be conducting their referendum on the proposed Foxwoods casino on June 23rd. However, the developers of the Somerset do not intend to submit their application any sooner, as they have requested for an extension from the state’s gaming commission. Considering the financials and after weighing the proposals, the Massachusetts Gaming Commission will make its final decision on the much-anticipated third casino license sometime this fall....

New York City Land Use Attorneys Getting Busier

As New York City Land Use Attorneys Getting Busier, Possible Boom Lies Ahead In a city where real estate commands a price higher than nearly anywhere else in the world, nothing is easy. This applies to middle and working class residents coping with the high cost of living, as well as to real estate investors and developers to whom New York City government can seem like a maze of approvals and strict standards, comprised of countless committees and interests, all of whom have their own priorities and powers to exercise. NYC’s Real Estate Market Increased real estate development activity is affecting New Yorkers who aren’t even involved in the real estate business. The so-called “pencil towers” going up around 57th Street near Central Park are redefining the city’s skyline and breaking records for both heights of residential buildings and sale prices of residential units. Ordinary Manhattan apartments are selling for substantially higher prices as well. According to the Wall Street Journal’s analysis of New York City Department of Finance data, the average sale price for a Manhattan co-op or condo in 2014 topped $1.68 million, which is more than 16% higher than 2013, and 10% above the peak prices in pre-recession 2008. Mayor de Blasio’s Affordable Housing Agenda Following the stabilization of the economy at large and the resulting increase in New York real estate development there was a mayoral changing of the guards. Since taking the reigns as Mayor on January 1st, 2014, Bill de Blasio has sought to establish contrast with his predecessor, the billionaire Wall Street magnate, Michael Bloomberg. A prime example of this contrast is placing a dramatic increase in affordable housing in the city as one of his top agenda items. His administration seeks to “to build and preserve 200,000 affordable units over the coming decade.” Achieving such an increase will require changes to...

Construction for New Allston – Brighton Commuter Rail Begins

This spring marked the commencement of construction for the new Boston Landing commuter rail station, part of the Allston-Brighton commuter line. The new station will be located adjacent to the Massachusetts Turnpike as part of commuter line that connects Framingham and Worcester to South Station. It is expected to open in fall 2016, two years later than the original projected completion date. The station is estimated to cost approximately $20 million ($4 – $6 million more than the original projected cost) and is being financed by New Boston Landing LLC, a New Balance development company. It will provide service to employees of the well-known shoe company, and direct access to the company’s planned Boston Landing development, a complex of restaurants, shops, a hotel, and athletic facilities. The headquarters are still under construction. A select panel put together by Gov. Charlie Baker earlier this year to study the state of the MBTA suggested that the agency should put expansion plans on hold. However, the panel also stated that projects like this one—which leverage private or federal money—should be exempt from any moratorium and should serve as an example of the type of construction the MBTA should pursue “to stretch every dollar.” But the protracted timeline also illustrates some of the potential difficulties of a public-private partnership. When private companies foot the bill for major infrastructure projects, the state may find itself beholden to their timeline. With a project like Boston landing, where a private company is ultimately paying the bill, it can be difficult to negotiate penalties for delayed construction. “Even if it was behind schedule, there aren’t any financial penalties because the private entity has agreed to foot that bill,” said MassDOT spokesman Mike Verseckes. It is an issue that the state could potentially encounter more frequently in the future, as the state considers other opportunities for public-private partnerships....

Will the MBTA Cause the Demise of 2024 Boston Olympics?

At a Suffolk University panel convened in Boston on March 17th, there was a discussion regarding two closely related subjects: improved infrastructure and the possibility of hosting the world’s Olympic Summer games in 2024. This past December, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said that the Olympics “allows us the opportunity to really talk to our partners in the state and federal government about upgrading the infrastructure that we have.” Additionally, a study by the state earlier in the year found that an Olympic bid would indeed be feasible. The only problem? After a tough winter– as you may have heard, Boston had record snowfall at 107.6 inches– is estimated that the MBTA system has a backlog of $6.7 billion in needed work. With this amount of money needed, there aren’t many options. One option would be to raise revenues or taxes. This could help not only solve existing problems, but tackle ones related to having a robust infrastructure for the upcoming Olympics. Current No Boston Olympics organizer and former MassDOT officer Chris Dempsey said that the pro-Olympics movement has objected to this. Another option would be to simply address one issue or the other, leaving the other for future resolution. For better or worse, the Olympics would probably go by the wayside if it came down to this. While the Olympics could bring in extra revenue, it also can be a strain on the city, one that is not absolutely necessary. The train stations that are already starting to undergo improvements include the Red and Orange line trains, along with the Government Center station. Incidentally, these renovations would also be needed if the Olympics were to take place. The expansion of South Station and upgrades on the JFK/UMass station would also be nearly necessary to host the Summer...

Study Says a Carefully Planned Boston Olympics Could Bring in Billions

As Boston prepares its bid for the 2024 Summer Olympic Games, supporters and detractors have come out of the woodwork. However, according to a study done by The Boston Foundation and the UMass Donahue Institute, the Olympics could bring up to $4 billion to the state’s economy. According to the study, the bulk of the revenues generated would come from the creation of 4,100 construction jobs during each of the six years needed to ready the city. In addition, the city could see increased revenue during the Olympic Games themselves with tourists adding an estimated $300 million. In addition, the study estimates that another 4,300 temporary jobs will be created just for the span of the Olympics.While the report outlines the economic benefits of having the Olympics in Boston, it also cautions against overspending with the warning that it would offset the economic benefits the Games would bring. Historically, other cities have exceeded their budgets for preparing for the Olympic Games by an average of 252 percent. The report points out that the International Olympic Committee has always exposed the host city to all financial obligations that come with hosting the games. While the report outlines the economic benefits of having the Olympic Games in Boston, it also raises substantial questions about the fiscal viability of having an Olympic-sized budget for the games. In addition to concerns with overspending, the report also points out shortfalls in public transportation and infrastructure that would need to be addressed. The report drew no conclusions as to the likelihood that Boston would receive a disproportionate amount of public money to improve its infrastructure. The study was also unable to determine how extensive these improvements would actually...

Quincy Officials See New Project Jumpstarting Downtown Redevelopment

In recent years, the city of Quincy has demonstrated an impressive commitment to its economic growth and revitalization. It was, in fact, the first city in the Commonwealth to receive District Improvement Financing (DIF), a state program that enabled the city to create a district improvement financing zone in Quincy Center. The plan is to use the newly generated tax revenues from businesses moving into the refurbished district to fund other important city infrastructure projects. A Master Tax Increment Financing (TIF) program has also been designated for the downtown area since 2005. This program awards those businesses who invest in Quincy Center and create new jobs a 5% local real estate tax exemption.  These businesses also become eligible for a state tax credit. The City’s downtown redevelopment plan has been in the works for some time and, in contrast to the huge downtown redevelopment plan announced at the start of 2014, the current plan seems financially sound and quite modest in scope. Quincy’s City Council established a new zoning district, increasing the height allowances, easing density and parking requirements, and instituting a streamlined permitting process. This zoning district encourages mixed-use development that should add to the vitality of the downtown. Quincy Mutual Fire Insurance and Gate Residential Properties are financing a 400-unit apartment building and $100 million retail project which will be the first portion of the redevelopment. Construction on a six-story apartment building containing 169 units will begin in early 2015 with completion targeted for 2016. This building will have 12,000 square feet of both retail and commercial space. A second building will follow which will have retail space and 220 apartments. The mayor of Quincy, Thomas Koch stated that “Quincy Mutual’s commitment to the city and its persistence in seeing this vision through to reality is nothing short of extraordinary. This plan confirms what we’ve known for some time — that Quincy Center’s potential is ready to be captured. The...

Worcester Chamber to Host Debate of Boston Olympics Bid

The Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce is about to host a debate discussing the pros and cons of Boston winning its bid to host the 2024 Olympics Games. The debate will be held as two separate functions, and is intended to discuss the possible implications for Worcester should Boston become the host city. Representatives from the Boston 2024 Partnership, sponsors for the bid to bring the Olympics to Massachusetts, as well as their opponents, No Boston Olympics, will present their arguments to chamber members. This debate will address the potential impacts of Boston becoming the host city and Worcester’s potential level of involvement should that occur. The discussion will begin on Tuesday, March 10, with opening statements from Richard Davey, former state transportation secretary and CEO of the Boston 2024 Partnership group. He will be discussing the partnership’s plan to run a cost-effective event using private funds, existing facilities and temporary venues. He will also discuss the organization’s belief that hosting the Olympics will greatly contribute to the commonwealth’s long-term growth. On Friday, March 13, the debate will continue with statements from Chris Dempsey and Kelley Gossett, co-chairs of No Boston Olympics. The group believes that a pattern of overspending, years of construction, and few proven economic benefits for past host cities, make hosting an undesirable choice for Boston. They will discuss their view that the state should maintain its budgetary focus on schools and rebuilding transportation infrastructure. A first time bidder in the Olympics, Boston beat out other major cities such as Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington D.C. to become the official U.S. entrant. While its bid is heavily dependent on the use of existing facilities such as Gillette Stadium and the TD Garden, several venues would have to be constructed before Boston could host an international event on the scale of the Olympics.  This list would...

Worcester Chamber Looks at Springfield Casinos as Model

  In what could soon become a blueprint for other regions to follow when planning for urban development, the proposed MGM Springfield casino is being set up to embrace its surrounding community rather than shut it out or physically divide it. According to James Murren, Chairman and CEO of MGM Resorts International, their $800 million casino project planned for Springfield’s South End hopes to establish a new model for the company’s casino communities. One person closely watching the situation is the President and CEO of Worcester’s Regional Chamber of Commerce, Timothy Murray, who says, “Their vision is to create a new paradigm that’s outward looking and encourages the kind of cross-pollenization of locally owned businesses.” Murray’s interest in the nearby project is directly related to Worcester’s $565 million CitySquare development project that is still under design. The hope is that the hotels and other needed developments in the downtown area for this project will be assessed carefully. Murray, former mayor of Worcester as well as the Commonwealth’s former lieutenant governor, compared the potential of this project to those of the past. According to Murray, instead of opening up new possibilities, a project may end up dividing the city like the Worcester Center Galleria ended up doing. During his time as Mayor of Worcester, Murray oversaw the demolition of that mall, the space it once occupied now being used for the CitySquare project. Muuray said the project, “is about undoing what the mall created and creating a true mixed-use district.”  It’s hoped that MGM Springfield will similarly embrace its surroundings and not  simply create an obstruction to community use of an urban area....

Massachusetts a Leader in LEED-certified Construction

For the third consecutive year, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts ranks among the U.S. Green Building Council‘s Top 10 in the US. The rankings consider sustainable building design, construction, restoration and rehabilitation and, in terms of square feet per capita, Massachusetts is fifth-best in the country for projects that adhere to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards, adding 99 LEED-certified projects last year. The top four states, from bottom to top, are: Virginia, Maryland, Colorado, and Illinois. Matthew Beaton, the state’s Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary, said that the ranking was an endorsement of Massachusetts’s requirement that all new construction and major renovations meet the state’s LEED Plus green building standard. “Clean energy is yielding significant economic benefits with 10.5 percent job growth in the last year and 47 percent growth since 2010,” said Beaton. The standard demands that energy performance for the new or renovated building be at least 20 percent better than the state’s building energy code, that the outdoor water consumption must be reduced by at least 50 percent, and that the indoor water consumption be reduced by at least 20 percent. In addition, principles of smart growth and smart energy must be promoted. Presently, there are 37 LEED-certified buildings in the state, with 70 percent of them certified either gold or platinum. Beaton said in a statement, “This recognition is another example of Massachusetts’ commitment to strengthening our economy, shaping our energy future and protecting our environment through clean jobs and technology.” The numbers bear those comments out, with almost 6,000 clean energy-related businesses in Massachusetts, employing a total of over 88,000 workers. Beaton also pointed out that Massachusetts was again – for the fourth consecutive year – named by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy as the top state in the country in energy...

The End of AstraZeneca in Westborough

The AstraZeneca plant in Westborough has announced it will shut its doors permanently by the end of 2015. This is the final step the company has taken to shut down the plant, having already decreased employee levels there from 800 to just 180.  More employees will be relieved by March, but others will remain employed until the company closes at the end of 2015. The closing of the facility means the city of Westborough will lose its biggest taxpayer. The AstraZeneca plant pays the city an estimated $2 million in total; $360,000 in property taxes and $1,548,547 for equipment taxes. Residents and businesses in Westborough will begin to feel the pinch of the revenue loss in fiscal year 2017. City officials hope to fill the vacancy quickly.   The building is 420,000 square feet and could be a great site for a wide spectrum of businesses. The AstraZeneca plant processed the asthma treatment Pulmicort Respules, which will now be produced at the company’s locations in Sweden and Australia. A company representative stated the move is to attain “increased efficiencies in our global supply chain.” AstraZeneca will continue to house its research-and-development operations in Massachusetts, with facilities in both Waltham and...

Medical Device Manufacturer Moves to Worcester

Cogmedix, a wholly owned subsidiary of Westborough-based Coghlin Companies Inc., recently announced the relocation of its world headquarters to 17 Briden Street in Worcester.  The medical device engineering and manufacturing services provider has become quite a success story in an increasingly important sector of the Commonwealth’s economy. Chris Coghlin, President and CEO of the Coghlin Companies, stated “We are very excited about the trajectory of Cogmedix and the recent relocation, renovation and expansion of this world-class facility. For more than 100 years, our family has shared a deep-rooted passion for the economic success of Worcester and its surrounding communities, and we look forward to adding many new jobs in the greater Worcester area for years to come. The proximity of this facility lends itself well to attract highly skilled technicians as well as engineering and supply chain personnel as our growth continues into 2015 and beyond.” Matt Giza, Vice President and General Manager of Cogmedix, said, “This move was made necessary by our steady pattern of growth. We really needed the additional space and these newly outfitted facilities are more than twice the size of our former location. This expansion will allow us to increase capacity to accommodate the needs of our customers, both existing and new, as well as provide improved inventory and supply chain management operations.” Addressing Cogmedix’ growing niche in manufacturing finished laser and optically-based medical devices, Giza noted that upgrades included the installation of five purpose-built, independently climate-controlled, laser-safe test labs. Amenities include new cafeteria spaces, modern conference rooms, and a new Customer Convenience Center featuring fully equipped workspaces exclusively for visiting clients to enable a more intimate and efficient product launch experience with total transparency. In addition to expanded production capacity and other benefits made possible by the much larger facility, the address itself has significant advantages. “Our new location,” Giza explained, “is at...

Great Wolf Water Park May Lose $17M in Tax Incentives

The possibility of rescinding a $17.2 million tax incentive package on a deal with Great Wolf Resorts is now being considered by Massachusetts’ Economic Assistance Coordinating Council (EACC) after it was discovered that the company selected subcontractors who didn’t use union labor for their water park’s  recently-completed renovation. The resort opened in Fitchburg earlier this year. After purchasing the former Holiday Inn in Fitchburg for $66 million, Great Wolf began construction on its water park. Last March, the company was awarded $16.5 million by the EACC in municipal property tax credits, along with an additional $700,000 for related issues. However, the New England Regional Council of Carpenters had previously complained during construction of the subcontractors using non-union laborers who were not covered by workmen’s compensation, a violation of Massachusetts state law. The union was able to obtain a brief stop-work order, but the project was completed and the facility opened its doors this past spring. The union’s main argument is that since the company was in violation of state law prior to the awarding of the multi-million dollar tax package, the tax breaks earned by the company should be voided. The furor has caused the EACC to create a special subcommittee to focus specifically on this controversial conflict. That subcommittee met last Tuesday to see if the tax credits should be taken away, as well as exploring whether or not state oversight of such programs should be revamped. They will then offer a recommendation to the full committee, which reconvenes on December 17. In previous cases asking for revocation of tax credits, the issue has usually been not reaching agreed-upon job targets. The EACC’s out-of-the-ordinary move raises the possibility that they might indeed take away the company’s credits. When asked for comment, Great Wolf says that they spend approximately $6 million with subcontractors in the state each year. They also pointed out that...

Improvements to South Station Could Boost Framingham/Worcester Rail

According to Massachusetts Transportation Secretary Richard Davey, Boston’s South Station is “becoming a choke point in the system and an obstacle to expanded service.” Davey placed a request with lawmakers on October 9 asking them for help with negotiating a deal that has the potential to allow the expansion of South Station. Before the MBTA can add an additional seven tracks to the existing 13, it must first purchase property owned by the U.S. Postal Service. This piece of land has been the topic of discussions for years. The property is critical for the expansion of the station in its efforts to provide prompt service to commuters traveling through South Station. The U.S. Postal Service and South Station “have yet to strike a deal,” said Davey, who will be leaving his post as transportation secretary at the end of October. He has asked Transportation Committee chairmen Sen. Thomas McGee (D-Lynn) and Rep. William Straus (D-Mattapoisett) for assistance with coming to an agreement. Davey also mentioned that the office is interested in purchasing property that once belonged to the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. This purchase would enable the expansion of the North Station rail lines with two new tracks and a center platform. Following the signing of a transportation bond bill in April, the Patrick administration re-engaged with the Postal Service, offering to build a $350 million mailing facility in the Boston Seaport District. “Frankly, we’re a little stuck,” Davey admits. “We’ve made a number of different proposals that we thought were compelling, that made the Post Office whole.” The Postal Service has expressed concerns that the new Seaport land would depreciate, resulting in a lower price if it should attempt to sell the property in the...

New Balance Expands Footprint in Brighton

New Balance has started construction to place a new headquarters in Brighton, MA. Adding to the widespread sport and health district along the Massachusetts Turnpike, the $500 million project will be called the Boston Landing. Previously the land was to be used for a Lowe’s home improvement store but due to resident opposition the space eventually ended up in the hands of New Balance. Construction has already begun on the six story headquarters designed by Elkus Manfredi Architects. The project is expected to take up to two years to complete. Speaking about economic development, New Balances’ chaiman Jim S. Davis said, “Washington could take a cue from what’s been accomplished here in Boston.” To go along with the fitness theme of the area and the company there will be a sports complex including state of the art training facilities for baseball, track and hockey. “This is going to be a transformative project for the entire region,” said State Representative Michael Moran, “The jobs and economic development here will spur growth in other industries as well.”   Google+...

MassWorks Infrastructure Program Enters New Round

Applications opened earlier this summer for the MassWorks Infrastructure Program – a program available for eligible public entities in need of funding to support economic development and job creation. The program opens a short window (September 3, 2013 – September 13, 2013) for entities to submit their applications for grant consideration. Grants offered this year will support housing or commercial growth opportunities that help support Massachusetts sustainability. In 2012, the Patrick Administration awarded $38 million to 26 MassWorks Infrastructure projects. Last year’s grants supported projects requiring infrastructure upgrades or expansions in order for new growth to take place. This year Gregory Bialecki, a spokeswoman for the Housing and Economic Development Secretary, announced that there is roughly $25 million available for projects. In past years, funding ranged from $200,000 to $10.1 million.   To read the full article, click here....

Access Fixtures Q&A: Is LED Lighting Worth It?

Imagine every application that requires lighting in your commercial facility. Can’t wrap your head around it? Needless to say, lighting can be a huge percentage of your annual energy costs. Energy efficient lighting like LED wall packs or LED bollard lights from Access Fixtures can make a significant difference in your energy bill. Surprisingly, 22% of America’s facilities have never undergone any type of lighting upgrade, or it has been more than 10 years since work has been done, according to a survey in the April 2013 issue of Today’s Facility Manager. That means 1.1 million facilities are wasting energy—and wasting money. You can start to calculate how much you’re spending each year by using an annual cost per watt chart. For example, energy is priced at approximately $0.15 per kilowatt hour in the Boston area. A walkway in a commercial area has 20 bollards equipped with 70 watt metal-halide lamps and ballasts. If the luminaires are on 7 days a week for ten hours a day, it would cost $0.55 for each watt and $770 in total annual costs. LED lighting tells a different story. What if the same bollards are equipped with 15 watt LED modules and drivers? If the luminaires are on 7 days a week for ten hours a day, it would cost $0.55 for each watt and $165 in total annual costs. For each year they delay switching to efficient lighting, they’re losing $605—only on the bollards! By considering all indoor and outdoor lighting, the difference can be thousands of dollars. With advanced LED technology and decreasing prices, LEDs now have a faster return on investment than ever before. Calculate how much money you’re wasting on energy costs using an annual cost per watt chart. Is it time to make a change?...

Synthetic Slate Roofing Maintains Curb Appeal of Classic Mass Homes

Neponset Valley Construction, a leading roofing company based in Norwood, Mass., recently completed a new roofing project on a Natick home. After the homeowners and their roof battled the harsh winter storms, they wanted a new roof that would stand up to the toughest and harshest conditions, that’s when they hired Neponset Valley Construction. The homeowners chose synthetic slate roofing as their material of choice. It’s easily understood why  synthetic slate roofing in Natick MA is popular after hearing that is produced to stand up to hail, winds in excess of 110 mph and fire!...

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